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THE SEVENTIES, EIGHTIES and NINETIES








 

 

This is a real mixed bag! Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas, Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorsese re-shaped film.  Spielberg, known for his ability to create and sustain suspense decided to make a comedy, “1941”.  In it, he spoofs the opening of “Jaws”. 

 

I have to ask myself, “How did George Lucas go from making “American Graffiti” to making “Star Wars”?  And “How did Francis Ford Coppola go from making “The Godfather” to making “The Outsiders”?  Watch how Oliver Stone re-writes history in “JFK” by weaving actual film footage into his movie in order to support his conspiracy theory.

 

Also notable for me was an actor by the name of Adolph Caesar, who starred in “A Soldier’s story”.  He was phenomenal!  Then there is the battle scene in “Glory”.  It always gives me goose bumps.  James Horner’s score is amazing.

 




One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, Jaws and “1941”



Apocalypse Now



Star Wars

 

The Deer Hunter and Raging Bull





Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom



A Soldier’s Story and Glory





The Color Purple, starring Whoopie Goldberg and Danny Glover and directed by Steven Spielberg.  Made in 1985, The Color Purple was nominated for 11 Academy Awards.

These scenes begin with Celie, the main character, secretly reading a letter from her sister who is a missionary in Africa, where Celie's son and daughter are also.  Celie's abusive husband has kept the letters hidden from Celie, therefore cutting her off from her loved ones and having her to depend solely on him.  When he slaps her at the beginning of these scenes, it is the last straw. 

I find these scenes compelling because of the parallel action between Celie and "Mister" and Celie's Sister and two children.  Sug Avery's attempts to prevent a tragedy adds to the tension that builds throughout the scenes.



Form Object



The Nineties and Beyond






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